Lean-angle sensor for motorbikes measures five dynamic parameters

October 05, 2012 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
Bosch introduced a new lean-angle sensor for motorcycles. It supplies data on the motorcycle's driving dynamics, providing the basis for numerous safety and comfort functions and ensuring safer, more comfortable, and also more dynamic motorcycling.

Bosch has introduced a new lean-angle sensor for motorcycles. It supplies data on the motorcycle's driving dynamics, providing the basis for numerous safety and comfort functions and ensuring safer, more comfortable, and also more dynamic motorcycling.

The sensor measures a number of physical values more than 100 times per second. These values include longitudinal, lateral, and vertical acceleration, as well as the motorcycle's yaw and roll rates. An algorithm uses these “5D” inertial sensor values to determine the lean and pitch angles and communicates them across the CAN bus. These data are required for a range of safety and comfort functions such as traction control, cornering light function, launch control, and wheelie-limiting function. The sensor values will also be used in the future as the basis for functions such as corner ABS, fall detection, wheelie control, and semi-active suspension.

Compared with the previous model, the SU-MM5.10 sensor’s size, weight, and power consumption have been further reduced. The sensor weighs 40 grams, some 60 percent less than the SU-MM3.10, providing greater design flexibility for motorcycle manufacturers. Thanks to new micromechanical components using MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology, the sensor consumes just 65 milliamperes of power – over 50 percent less its predecessor. The SU-MM5.10 can be combined with motorcycle ABS systems from Bosch or third parties. Based on customer specifications, the lean and pitch angle can also be computed using an external control unit, with Bosch Engineering’s lean-angle sensor providing the necessary 5D inertial sensor values for model-specific safety and comfort functions.

The new sensor has already found its way into the industry. The KTM 1190 Adventure and KTM 1190 Adventure R are the world's first motorcycles to be fitted with the device.