More on PUF-security through software only, from Intrinsic ID

February 13, 2017 // By Graham Prophet
Last week, we posted news from security and key-management technology provider Intrinsic ID that the company can now provide its unique-to-every-chip physically unclonable function or PUF, on any SoC using only software.

That report is here; we now have to hand some further explanatory information on what Intrinsic ID is offering in its BROADKEY, that can provision unique keys and identities for nearly all microcontrollers without need for security-dedicated silicon.

 

As before, the scheme employs SRAM, but in this case, SRAM that is already extant on the processor-based IC in question. Intrinsic ID's software reads the uninitialised vales in which the SRAM array powers-up; the minute process variations across each chip and every chip on a wafer erve to set this as a unique and repeatable value. The technique requires 500 Bytes of SRAM; Pim Tuyls, chief executive officer of Intrinsic ID, says that a version is in development for very constrained designs for which 250 Bytes will suffice.

 

The typical added code size to install the PUF functionality is from 10 kB to 25 kB. Embedded designers will be able to access the PUF-in-software offering on a conventional licensing-plus-royalty pricing model, with costs, Tuyls says, “depending on volume.” Further announcements on the technique, and on its delivery, are promised at a alter date.

 

Intrinsic ID; www.intrinsic-id.com

 

see also; PUF-security now possible through software only, says Intrinsic ID