NVIDIA sets up hybrid GPU co-design lab in Zurich

November 07, 2013 // By Nick Flaherty
NVIDIA is partnering with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich to set up a Co-Design Lab for Hybrid Multicore Computing.

The new lab will give students and scientists access to GPU-based supercomputing systems and hybrid GPU/CPU programming environments and NVIDIA will be offering hands-on training, and the latest tools and resources, to help scientists tune their research for current and next-generation GPU-accelerated supercomputers. It will support a number of scientific applications that are used by computational scientists, including the COSMO weather simulation application, the CP2K, GROMACS, and NAMD molecular dynamics applications and the SPECFEM3D seismology and geodynamics applications.
"Delivering cost-effective, scalable performance while utilising far less energy than comparable CPU-based systems, these systems, to many industry experts, represent the next 10-20 years of computational science," said Peter Messmer, director of the Co-Design Lab for Hybrid Multicore Computing . "Recognising this, we’re partnering with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich) – Albert Einstein’s alma mater – to establish the lab to give students and scientists access to GPU-based supercomputing systems and programming environments. We will offer hands-on training, and the latest tools and resources, to help scientists tune their research for current and next-generation GPU-accelerated supercomputers. We will also work with scientists to advance their computational models to fully utilise the GPU horsepower."
One of the lab’s key aims is to encourage tighter collaboration among computing system architects, integrators, application developers, and researchers, providing an open channel for all involved to exchange ideas and experiences. This, in turn will be used to speed up the design of new applications and technologies that will drive the next wave of computational scientific research and discovery.
At first, the lab will focus on six scientific domain areas: meteorology and climate; geophysics; materials science and nanotechnology; life science; astro- and plasma-physics; as well as biomedical engineering and fluid mechanics. The Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) in Lugano will collaborate closely with the lab, supplying computing resources and technical expertise to help domain scientists get running quickly and efficiently on these GPU-accelerated