Programmable PSUs tuned to battery-powered devices/low power semiconductor test

August 06, 2014 // By Graham Prophet
Keithley's Series 2280S precision measurement, low noise, programmable DC power supplies are also sensitive measurement instruments with the speed and dynamic range essential for measuring standby current loads and load current pulses that battery-powered wireless, medical, and industrial devices produce.

Typical applications include characterising battery-powered medical devices, wireless sensors, RFID tags, intrinsically safe devices, and consumer electronics, as well as new, low power semiconductor devices.

Series 2280S supplies can output up to 192W of low noise, linear regulated DC power. The Model 2280S-32-6 can output up to 32V at up to 6A, and the Model 2280S-60-3 can output up to 60V at up to 3.2A. Although their sourcing and measurement performance is a step above that of conventional power supplies, Series 2280S supplies have conventional power supply pricing.

Unlike conventional power supplies, Series 2280S supplies can make voltage and current readback measurements with up to 6½ digits of resolution for maximum precision or as low as 3½ digits for greater speed. Voltage output measurements can be resolved down to 100 µV. Load currents from 100 nA to 6A can be monitored with high accuracy. Four load current measurement ranges (10A, 1A, 100 mA, and 10 mA) support measuring full load currents, standby mode currents, and small sleep mode changes precisely.

For monitoring fast-changing and pulse-like load currents, Series 2280S supplies can capture dynamic load currents as short as 140µsec to monitor load currents in all operating modes for determining total power consumption of the device. They also support measuring each state of a power-up load sequence and a power-down sequence. Measurements as fast as 2,500 readings per second make it possible to characterise and test the current draw at each of the start-up states.

Series 2280S users who need to test devices or systems with high in-rush currents can program the voltage output's rise time to slow the voltage ramp and avoid voltage overshoot, which could potentially damage the DUT. Voltage fall time is also programmable to prevent a fast ramp down of the output voltage.

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