Rapid prototyping tool eases the development of motion-enabled products

April 24, 2012 // By Julien Happich
The Chemistry of Motion tool from Movea enables the rapid prototyping of new motion features for customers in the mobile, interactive TV, sports, and health markets.

Built on Movea's patented SmartMotion “atoms”, Chemistry of Motion builds on the fundamental elements of human motion and tools for combining SmartMotion atoms into molecules of more complex, end-user features.

“We have been researching motion for many years,” said Bruno Flament, Movea’s CTO. “As we started identifying the fundamental building blocks of human activity, we saw that these atomic motion elements fell into a natural organization based on defining parameters such as category of motion, complexity, placement and combination of sensors, as well as the element’s inputs and outputs by which they bond to each other. In some ways, we were facing a similar challenge to what Dmitri Mendeleev faced when he was trying to make sense of the chemical elements.”

Movea’s Chemistry of Motion characterizes and organizes the basic elements of human motion and assembles them into “molecules” which represent the richer, more complex end-user features that the market is increasingly demanding. In Movea’s Table of SmartMotion Elements, basic features are organized into columns according to the type of motion analysis they perform. Each element in the table is characterized by fundamental properties such as category of motion, computational complexity, sensor configuration and sensor placement.

The creation of new features by assembling motion atoms into molecules is accelerated through a powerful internal toolkit the company’s engineers have developed called MoveaLab. Bruno Flament explains, “When developing new features, our engineers think in terms of data flows in a functional diagram. To accelerate our development time, we created a signal processing design studio where our extensive library of algorithms and IP have been converted into functional blocks that can be organized into a signal processing data flow by simply clicking and dragging into place with a computer mouse.

Our engineers can immediately see how the processing flows work with real sensor data, in real-time and then fine tune the flow to analyze and optimize performance. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) has