Remote spectrum monitor boosts interference detection & tracking

January 13, 2016 // By Graham Prophet
Anritsu’s MS27101A Remote Spectrum Monitor, says the company, gives government regulators and university lab researchers an accurate tool to mitigate interference problems and identify illegal or unlicensed signal activity.

The MS27101A can be used with Anritsu’s Vision software to create a highly accurate remote solution for government regulators and university lab researchers to identify interference patterns, record spectrum history and geo-locate the sources of problem signals.

The Remote Spectrum Monitor addresses the market need for an accurate remote solution for white space monitoring, harm claim threshold detection, in-building interference monitoring, positive train control system protection and locating illegal/unlicensed signal sources or similar interference. Housed in a half-rack enclosure, the MS27101A is suitable for spectrum monitoring where a small footprint is required.

The MS27101A is capable of sweeping at rates up to 24 GHz/sec, allowing capture of intermittent signals, including periodic or transient transmissions as well as short “bursty” signals. High dynamic range of >106 dB normalised to 1 Hz BW, 20 MHz instantaneous bandwidth, high sensitivity and low spurious signals allow the MS27101A to reliably monitor low-level signals. Power consumption is typically less than 11W, which allows the MS27101A to be powered by solar cells in remote locations.

When used with the optional Vision software, the MS27101A Remote Spectrum Monitor can record spectrum history and geo-locate the signal of interest. Three or more MS27101A monitors are needed to approximate the position of the interfering signal. Vision software provides complete command and control of all spectrum monitoring probes deployed in the field. The software operates on Windows-based PCs/servers, communicating with the MS27101A via Gigabit Ethernet or a USB cellular modem.

An integrated web server allows the Remote Spectrum Monitor to be accessed by users anywhere in the world via an Internet browser. After logging in, full control is possible. Simultaneously, trace data, spectrograms and other measurements can be viewed inside the browser window.

Anritsu; www.anritsu.com