Tek renews basic troubleshooting/education scope line, from €1,140

August 02, 2016 // By Graham Prophet
Tektronix says its TDS2000 series is the most widely-used scope in the world: now, it has introduced a completely new product in that space, for basic lab signal viewing, and for education – the TBS2000. It offers, Tek says, the best signal viewing in its class, with a 9-inch, widescreen-format LCD and the longest record length in this market sector.

Models are available with 70 MHz or 100 MHz bandwidth and with 2 or 4 channels. The instrument’s design exploits the widespread availability of high-quality, 16 x 9 format LCD to offer a WVGA display that can display 15 horizontal (time) divisions allowing users to see 50% more signal than any other scope in this category. Long record length is only valuable if signals can easily be manipulated to find events in the record; this instrument’s 20 Mpoint record length together with single-knob pan and zoom provides the ability to capture long time duration signals and easily navigate to find important details.


Tek identifies a number of issues around the use of ‘basic’ scope; one is measurement confidence – that is, is the image on the screen a true representation of the waveform: and another is use of probes. The two are linked, with the user possibly requiring a x10 (or more) probe so as to not load the circuit under test, and then remembering to scale the waveform on the screen accordingly. For the first time in a unit in this class, Tek says, it has included support for the Tektronix VPI probe interface so that users can employ a wide range of Tektronix active probes at an affordable price, that are automatically recognised and scaled, by the instrument. There is a suite of automated measurements, and full cursor readout.

Triggering also borrows from higher-priced ranges, with a range of edge, pulse-width and ‘runt’ (anomalous level) trigger settings. A basic FFT function is also included. Interfacing allows connection to WiFi via USB; and for use in an LXI environment, the scope generates a web page. Interfaces, like many other features of the scope, are aimed at education users. As well as context-help, which is available “everywhere” - the scope brings up help in transparent panels that can be read without obscuring the waveforms – the units can be